What’s your Pollinator Habitat Story?

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To date, our Adirondack Pollinator Project has given away over 72,000 free wildflower seed packets, built 30 community pollinator gardens, and sold over 7,000 native flowering plants. We’ve also conducted dozens of workshops, and other educational activities to build awareness and empower our communities to advocate for pollinators. 

Now, we’re collecting stories about your experiences creating pollinator habitat, and sharing them with the community so we can all learn from each other. 

Whether you’ve planted our free wildflower seeds, bought plants through our annual native plant sale, received a pollinator garden through our community Garden Assistance Program, or reduced mowing to create habitat, we want to hear about it!

Take a look at some of our first stories on our Pollinator Habitat Stories page, and share your experiences with us to be included.

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