2014 Salt Conference Videos Now Available

Eight videos from the September 2014 Winter Road Maintenance Conference are now available on Youtube. 

View Conference Videos Here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQMK0_iovpmsQW0K_aeie1sV0Lp1ZDeBk

Organizations Seek Alternatives to Road Salt that Keep Roads Safe, Water Clean in the Adirondacks

Organizations Seek Alternatives to Road Salt that Keep Roads Safe, Water Clean in the Adirondacks

PAUL SMITHS, N.Y. — Salt contamination of our streams, watersheds and aquifers from aggressive use of salt in winter road maintenance has become a major threat to the ecology of the Adirondacks, local advocates warn.

Finding ways to minimize or avoid that threat while keeping roads safe is the goal of the third annual Adirondack Winter Road Maintenance Conference, which will explore alternatives to current road salting and clearing policies at Paul Smith’s College on September 16, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.

“AdkAction.org and the Adirondack Council invite the public to join us for an update on the progress made since the last conference in 2012,” said Lee Keet, Water Quality Chair of AdkAction.org.  “After this conference, we will make additional recommendations for action to curb this growing problem.”

“Some of the Park’s best research scientists have been studying the road salt problem and its impact on the health of the Park’s environment and our communities,” said William C. Janeway, Executive Director of the Adirondack Council. “Road salt takes a toll on road, bridges, fish, wildlife, aquatic plants, roadside trees, wildflowers, and water quality.  We need to implement workable alternatives that keep roads safe and water clean.”

Seminal studies presented at the first road salt conference in 2010 documented the impact that current winter road maintenance procedures are having on Adirondack groundwater.  A second (2012) study authored by Dr. Dan Kelting of the Paul Smith’s College Adirondack Watershed Institute was presented at the second conference and then published in peer-reviewed journals.  It demonstrated that 86 percent of the sodium and chloride buildup in Adirondack Park watersheds can de directly attributed to current New York State road salting policies.

Highlights of the Sept. 16 conference will include:

  • Experts from the Adirondack Watershed Institute will review recent advances in the science and their studies of road runoff;
  • NYS DOT will present the results of two-year’s worth of testing alternative methods on three road systems;
  • An expert from the Cary Institute for Ecosystem Studies will discuss road salt’s environmental impacts;
  • The manager responsible for Colorado’s maintenance and operations will share how they moved away from road salt and what the implications of alternated deicers are;
  • A former New York State Assistant Attorney General who has taught the legal issues surrounding winter road maintenance will address the liabilities associated with reducing our dependence on salt; and,
  • Three breakout sessions will attempt to identify additional research needed, alternative scenarios for reducing salt use, and the possibilities or moving away from a ‘clear roads’ policy.

The event is free and open to all, but attendance will be limited to registered guests.  The conference, coffee breaks and lunch are being underwritten by the Adirondack Council and AdkAction.org.  Those who wish to attend can register at www.AdkAction.org/conference.

The Adirondack Council is a privately funded, not-for-profit organization dedicated to ensuring the ecological integrity and wild character of New York’s six-million-acre Adirondack Park.  The Council envisions an Adirondack Park with clean air and pure water, with protected core wilderness areas surrounded by working forests and farms, and vibrant local communities.

AdkAction.org undertakes specific projects that have clearly defined goals and that improve the Adirondacks for all users. Find out more at www.AdkAction.org.

More content to discover

One North Country site will be selected to receive a community-scale composter from Compost for Good

AdkAction’s Compost for Good (CfG) project is looking for a new home for a community scale in-vessel drum composter. The 4’x20′ design is capable of processing up to 50,000 pounds of food scraps per year and will be made available to a North Country Site Host to be used as

Read More »

Compost for Good project awarded $170K for community composting initiatives

SARANAC LAKE, N.Y. — Turning food waste into compost will be easier for North Country communities, thanks to expanded funding for a regional community-scale composting program. AdkAction and the Adirondack North Country Association (ANCA) announced that the Compost for Good (CfG) initiative has been awarded $170,000 in grants to provide

Read More »

Fair Share Program Served 100 Families this Growing Season

This summer, AdkAction launched the second year of our Fair Share program, a component of our food security project that funds participation in local farm CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) shares for qualified area residents. Each week, participants in the Fair Share program receive a selection of fresh fruits and vegetables

Read More »
Close